How to resolve a “Banned links: shared link or file request not working” error message

If your links or file requests are banned, you still have access to your Dropbox account and all your files. If your link or file request was banned, the best way to resolve it is to contact support.

If you see a banned link error message, it means that we’ve been asked to temporarily or permanently “ban” the link due to one of the following reasons:

1. The link or request generated a large amount of traffic

This can happen if you shared a link and someone shared it with lots of other people, or if someone forwarded your file request to lots of other people.

2. The link or request exceeded our bandwidth or download limits

This can happen if you requested files and received a large number of uploads, or you shared a link and someone downloaded it many times.

3. The link or request went to copyrighted content

This can happen if you’re trying to share pirated music or movies. 

How long does the ban last, and what should I do next? 

The first time you see a banned link error message, your link or file request will be disabled for 24 hours. After 24 hours, we recommend you:

  1. Rename the original file
  2. Re-upload it to Dropbox
  3. Create a completely new share link or file request.  

Note: For every ban after the first one, your link will be disabled for longer than 24 hours. 

Who will see the banned link error message? 

When you receive a banned link error message, we'll send a message to the email address registered to your account. Your links will be temporarily disabled, and anyone who tries to access them will see an error page instead of your files.

What are the bandwidth limits on my links? Can I purchase more?

Dropbox doesn’t offer a way to buy more bandwidth allowance for your account.

To prevent abuse, Dropbox accounts have the following limits:

  • Basic (free) accounts: 20 GB of bandwidth and 100,000 downloads per day
  • Plus, Professional, and Business accounts: 200 GB and unlimited downloads per day

I don't think my links generated that much traffic

Each upload and download, even if it’s made by the same person multiple times, counts toward your bandwidth limit. For example, if you have a 2 GB file and someone downloads it five times, that’s 10 GB of bandwidth.

If you still don’t think your link received that much traffic, we recommend you contact support.

Why am I seeing “Error 429”?

If you see “Error 429”, then the owner of the shared link or file request may have caused too much traffic. 

How can I prevent banned links in the future? 

In the future, make sure you name every new file something unique from the one that was banned. 

Dropbox Professional and Business users: You may be able to reduce traffic by setting passwords and expirations on your links.

Having a different shared link issue? 

Learn more about common shared link issues and fixes

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